Japanese Criminal Law in DC

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megamind1988
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Japanese Criminal Law in DC

Postby megamind1988 » August 24th, 2015, 2:16 pm

As I readed books about japanese criminal law in Wikipedia, I noticed that japanese criminal law has very strict rules either for the law and even for the criminals and I wish this works for both of them, specially for the culprits in order to redeem themselves to start a new life, so japan will be safe forever either in Detective Conan and the real Japan. ;)
Iwamoto Yuri
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Re: Japanese Criminal Law in DC

Postby Iwamoto Yuri » August 24th, 2015, 2:40 pm

I guess that would still depend on the type of criminal. I doubt all of them woud want to redeem themselves.
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Mario2000
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Re: Japanese Criminal Law in DC

Postby Mario2000 » August 24th, 2015, 3:29 pm

However, the situation seems to be kind of hypocritical: the laws are strict, yet they allow the yakuza to exist (or at least allowed until recent times), I even read in some article the police said the yakuza are useful for keeping order. Yeah, right, and also for selling child pornography.
However, in spite of this, I read the crime rate is surprisingly low in Japan.

As for the culprits in DC, they make me feel pity too, but stories like that are rare in real life. Most crimes aren't committed for despair and lack of justice in real life, but for money, power, sometimes jealosy etc. DC isn't realistic in this aspect, in its stories the victims are the "bad guys" more than the ones who take revenge on them. I mean, the "avengers" are only the follow-up of the impunity of the victims. I think we have discussed this earlier in other topics.
megamind1988
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Re: Japanese Criminal Law in DC

Postby megamind1988 » August 25th, 2015, 3:23 am

Spoiler:
I guess that would still depend on the type of criminal. I doubt all of them woud want to redeem themselves.

Well I know the murderous maniacs who tried to kill the protagonist don't want to redeem themselves, What I mean are the ones that are conscious of their evil deeds when they're arrested by the law. :)
cend1929
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Re: Japanese Criminal Law in DC

Postby cend1929 » September 2nd, 2016, 8:38 am

megamind1988 wrote:As I readed books about japanese criminal law Seal Arrest Records in Wikipedia, I noticed that japanese criminal law has very strict rules either for the law and even for the criminals and I wish this works for both of them, specially for the culprits in order to redeem themselves to start a new life, so japan will be safe forever either in Detective Conan and the real Japan. ;)

I also read about Japanese criminal law and find out the law has very strict. they strictly follow the penal code or legal code.
Lighthouse01
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Re: Japanese Criminal Law in DC

Postby Lighthouse01 » September 29th, 2016, 12:17 am

Well I know the murderous maniacs who tried to kill the protagonist don't want to redeem themselves
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zaclee1992
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Re: Japanese Criminal Law in DC

Postby zaclee1992 » November 23rd, 2016, 1:01 am

megamind1988 wrote:As I readed books about japanese criminal law in Wikipedia, I noticed that japanese criminal law has very strict rules either for the law of Conveyancing Camden and even for the criminals and I wish this works for both of them, specially for the culprits in order to redeem themselves to start a new life, so japan will be safe forever either in Detective Conan and the real Japan. ;)


Hello
As criminal law strict every where as is depends on country who follows or not.
micke34
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Re: Japanese Criminal Law in DC

Postby micke34 » December 28th, 2016, 2:13 am

Mario2000 wrote:However, the situation seems to be kind of hypocritical: the laws are strict, yet they allow the yakuza to exist (or at least allowed until recent times), Even there is no convencing service i read in some article the police said the yakuza are useful for keeping order. Yeah, right, and also for selling child pornography.
However, in spite of this, I read the crime rate is surprisingly low in Japan.

As for the culprits in DC, they make me feel pity too, but stories like that are rare in real life. Most crimes aren't committed for despair and lack of justice in real life, but for money, power, sometimes jealosy etc. DC isn't realistic in this aspect, in its stories the victims are the "bad guys" more than the ones who take revenge on them. I mean, the "avengers" are only the follow-up of the impunity of the victims. I think we have discussed this earlier in other topics.


Hello Mario2000,

yes thats true the crime rate in japan is low while the crime rate in china is more as compared to japan.
thepast123
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Re: Japanese Criminal Law in DC

Postby thepast123 » January 20th, 2017, 2:35 am

megamind1988 wrote:As I readed books about japanese criminal law in Wikipedia, I noticed that japanese criminal law has very strict rules either for the law and even for the criminals and I wish this works for both of them, specially for the culprits in order to redeem themselves to start a new life, so japan will be safe forever either in Nevada Online dui classes Detective Conan and the real Japan. ;)


Hello
In Japan, driving while intoxicated (DWI) applies to anyone with a blood-alcohol-content of .08 or greater. Maximum jail time for DWI under the revised law is five years or a fine not to exceed about $8,800.
Xytan Whitcombe
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Re: Japanese Criminal Law in DC

Postby Xytan Whitcombe » March 23rd, 2017, 3:39 pm

The police in Japan allow the Yakuza to exist as there must always be an opposition in all things. This has worked somewhat well here in Hawai'i, as the local Syndicate has driven out attempts by more hard core American gangs to introduce more dangerous drugs and such.

It is better to have a locally grown organized crime syndicate who feels connected to the community and its interests than a foreign one.

Are they criminals? Certainly, but taking them down just breeds worse.
Mario2000
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Re: Japanese Criminal Law in DC

Postby Mario2000 » March 24th, 2017, 4:52 pm

Xytan Whitcombe wrote:The police in Japan allow the Yakuza to exist as there must always be an opposition in all things. This has worked somewhat well here in Hawai'i, as the local Syndicate has driven out attempts by more hard core American gangs to introduce more dangerous drugs and such.

It is better to have a locally grown organized crime syndicate who feels connected to the community and its interests than a foreign one.

Are they criminals? Certainly, but taking them down just breeds worse.

I am not so sure about that....Foreign criminals or local ones, it's not like keeping the locals is more "patriotic", and if it was, then the concept of "patriotism" would lose any positive connotation. Criminals are always criminals. I can understand if the police prefers locals because with foreign crime there would be a problem of hiring more translators, studying foreign crime culture aspects, behavior, way of doing business they are not used to, and therefore not yet prepared to deal with efficiently. BUT, there is one aspect that is the most relevant imo: the Yakuza (at least a number of them) deal in CHILD PORNOGRAPHY AND CHILD PROSTITUTION. I am not sure if all crime organizations in all countries are involved in that, probably not. Anything is better than that, even heroin dealers don't reach the same level of being disgusting imo. If the yakuza followed a code of honor or whatever all the criminal organizations with a long history always blabber about, they would have either killed off or turned to the police all their members who get profit from this. No crime is worse than rape of children, at least I can't imagine one....
Nemomon
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Re: Japanese Criminal Law in DC

Postby Nemomon » March 24th, 2017, 5:13 pm

I think Xytan meant that these "own" criminals to some degree protect the native people, and respect the native culture. Foreigners do not care about native culture or beliefs, and will do things that others, including criminals, would not do. I think this is even more transparent for cultures that aren't connected with other cultures by a land (like Hawai'i and Japan that both are only islands).
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Xytan Whitcombe
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Re: Japanese Criminal Law in DC

Postby Xytan Whitcombe » March 24th, 2017, 5:42 pm

I agree that it is disgusting, but then again so is eating snails in France. There is a very different legal precedent in Japan compared to its more Westernized counterparts. In Japan's case they have a more organized Joshi Kousei business, whereas individuals in Southern Asia are outright abducted, drugged, and imprisoned. The Middle East is far worse when it comes to the sexual exploitation of children especially as it relates to the family.

The truth is that Japan is not equipped to handle organized crime just as its Defense Forces are not equipped to go to war. They don't have a legal system capable of prosecuting Mafia-esque groups. They cannot provide adequate protection to witnesses. The police also ultimately lack the necessary funding to successfully root out crime. The best analog here would be the Black Organization, does anyone here really believe that the Tokyo Metropolian Police Department and associates can do anything against it? Right now, the Yakuza are known and operate within the open with some sense of honor. This puts tremendous strain on them as anyone actually caught is going to have their fingers chopped off and be forced to turn themselves in rather than risk an investigation.

I am in no way defending their actions or excusing them as anything but wrong. But Japan has for a long time been trying to navigate between Scylla and Charybdis. If you squeeze them, if you hammer them to the point of desperation, the ship will inevitably head towards Charybdis. Crime going underground would doom Japan and lead to immeasurable loss of life. After all, if you are now a wanted criminal for the fact of your existence and facing 20-50 years in prison, why stop there? Kill, eat, drink, rob, be merry for tomorrow you die.

Nemomon is right. Foreigners will not care, neither do they feel a connection to the community. The Yakuza sent large amounts of relief supplies to the victims of the Earthquake/Tsunami. Could you imagine the Chinese Triad one day getting up and saying, "I think we'll get involved in disaster relief!" - Probably not. The Yakuza's status as a public group means that they have an image to maintain and thus to some degree are answerable to the people.
Mario2000
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Re: Japanese Criminal Law in DC

Postby Mario2000 » March 25th, 2017, 3:12 pm

Xytan Whitcombe wrote:The truth is that Japan is not equipped to handle organized crime just as its Defense Forces are not equipped to go to war. They don't have a legal system capable of prosecuting Mafia-esque groups. They cannot provide adequate protection to witnesses. The police also ultimately lack the necessary funding to successfully root out crime.

That's an aspect I am especially interested in. In fact, I noticed that the Yakuza organizations aren't illegal by themselves and there are no laws like RICO in America or "mafia association" in Italy to prosecute them as a criminal organization. I mean, they can have offices with names of their syndicates written above their doors without needing to hide it. In USA, for example, could you imagine a company with "Gambino crime family" or "Sinaloa cartel embassy" written on the door? ;D
But lately, I read there have been more crack-downs on the Yakuza, at least as far as the existing laws allow. One particular thing I noticed that sounds rather funny for me as a Detective Conan fan: in the last couple of years, the police are targeting a group called Kudo-kai (the names of the groups are formed from the original founder's surname and the word "kai" or "gumi"). So, I wonder if the founder of the Kudo-Kai was Kudo Shinichi, alias Edogawa Conan? ;D ;D ;D

Jokes apart, the current boss is Nomura Satoru and the original founder seems to be Kudo Genji (it's written on wikipedia at least, although it's often unreliable, have to check in books about the subject). The books about the Yakuza available in English aren't many though, and none of the ones written by Japanese authors seem to have been translated. However, from what I read, the only Yakuza boss to suffer the maximum penalty, a death sentence, for murder, was one Yano Osamu, boss of the Yano Mutsumi-kai, a group that separated itself from the larger syndicate named Sumiyoshi-kai. Yano sent hitmen to kill some rivals in a bar in 2003 and didn't even order them to try not to hit bystanders, 3 random people who didn't have anything to do with the gang war were gunned down. Strange though, there are news from 2016, about Yano confessing to another murder, so he is still alive, even though sentenced to death in 2007....Do they have appeals lasting decades, like in USA and Italy?

One another infamous Yakuza character is Goto Tadamasa, former head of the Goto-gumi group. I read he was expelled from the organization and became a buddhist priest (really, I can't imagine what would a self-control-lacking thug like him do among people of a peaceful religion)? I read he had the film director Juzo Itami thrown from the roof of his house for making a film which showed the yakuza as violent thugs (which they are, especially ones like Goto) and showed how people can resist extortion. It was a nice film, named "Minbo no Onna", I watched it, but to be honest I would have never expected for it to cause such a reaction, after all it's not like it exposed the whole crime system of Japan or threatened powerful people with revelations....Goto must be really a psycho if this movie was enough for him to torment Itami for years before forcing him to jump from the roof at gun point. He threatened the American journalist Jake Adelstein too, because he wrote about Goto fraudelently getting an expensive surgery in the USA without waiting his turn, in exchange for a promise to tell the FBI important information about the yakuza, yet he didn't provide anything relevant and just made everybody look like fools, while normal people have to wait their turns for a long time for such surgeries. I think I read a yakuza informant later told Adelstein how did they kill Juzo Itami at Goto's orders, while officially it is still listed as "suicide".... :( :( :(

Sorry for the very long post, it's just the Yakuza subject was brought up and I am interested in the topic of fighting against organized crime, although I don't know very much about the situation in Japan, only something from articles that get translated for international newspapers.
Xytan Whitcombe
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Re: Japanese Criminal Law in DC

Postby Xytan Whitcombe » March 25th, 2017, 3:31 pm

Well, I think an interesting thing on the original topic of redeeming criminal offenders is...

Article 38 of Japan's Constitution categorically requires that "no person shall be convicted or punished in cases where the only proof against suspect is his/her own confession."

Of course, arrest itself is seen in the eyes of the public as a presumption of guilt and the central evidence for conviction lays in police interrogation reports so the game is rigged. They pretty much put you in isolation until you decide to co-operate. But considering the ease at which many suspects simply confess to their crimes and turn themselves in despite extremely convoluted murder plots and circumstances in the DCU, I would really love to see an episode where Kogoro, Ran, and Conan run into a former murder suspect who could not be convicted based on his confession and lack of clues and is currently back in society.

The trick to beating Conan is simply to confess immediately, have him forget about you, and get your case thrown out in court.

EDIT:

I am just returning from extended travel ever since Okiya Subaru first moved in to the Kudo residence. If the above has happened since then, forgive my ignorance.

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