Your favorite Mystery novels

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Heiji

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Re: Your favorite Mystery novels

Postby Heiji » March 6th, 2008, 8:14 pm

Thanks for the Tip, I'll keep it in mind. Mystery would have been great, but in Edogawa's Case it's not that necessary cause I always wanted to read a book from the epitomy of our beloved tantei-san ;)
tetra26
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Re: Your favorite Mystery novels

Postby tetra26 » March 7th, 2008, 12:45 am

Anything involving Poirot. And yes, Poirot > Holmes.

At the risk of getting pointed at and laughed at by y'all, I still have mad love for Nancy Drew. The books are not literary masterpieces (at least, not the newer ones), but I have a nostalgic fondness for them anyhow. Same with Batman TPB's -- some people consider them childish, but I have great love for it nonetheless.
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Re: Your favorite Mystery novels

Postby x64_02 » March 7th, 2008, 11:35 am

I've read and love all of Rex Stout's novels that feature Nero Wolfe (best known for his A&E series now).  I've read but cannot say I loved the hard boiled mysteries.  I've read Hammett's Maltese Falcon and Chandler's The Big Sleep and in both cases I liked the films better.  Hammett writes as if it were a script so you lose nothing from the book to the screen but you do in the reverse direction.  Chandler fills the book full of useless information so that you don't know who the killer is but after everything was said and done, one victim couldn't have been killed by anyone.
Enough about early twentieth American detective fiction.  England!  I, too, love Poirot.  I haven't read the books, but I have watched the entire series produced by ITV and the anime Great Detectives Poirot and Marple.  I also enjoy Ms. Marple books and both recent tv adaptations.  I agree that Brett is the best Holmes and have watched all of that also.  Murder Rooms is another good series which follows Conan Doyle and the guy he based Holmes on as they solve crimes in a Holmes-esque manner.  I enjoy Caroline Graham's novels which I read because I loved the series they started, Midsomer Murders.  The characters in the novels are different from the show as you might have noticed the difference between the first and second series of the show (the second series and on are originals the first series are adaptations)(If you watch the DVD's the 5th series is actually the first).  Val Mcdermid I enjoy for her Wire in the Blood series of books (and once again the show that followed).  See a pattern emerging?  Another of this type is Inspector Lynley by American author Elizabeth George even though the stories take place in England.  I'll stop here.
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EdogawaConanTantei

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Re: Your favorite Mystery novels

Postby EdogawaConanTantei » March 7th, 2008, 10:25 pm

I've not much business in this topic, as the only novels I've read were:

1. And Then There Were None (when I read it, it was the shit.. now.. well let me continue)
2. A Study in Scarlet(more a novella)
3. Hound of the Baskervilles
4. The Valley of Fear


... and now I've read EVERY Holmes short story..


.. chances are if you liked "Study in Scarlet" then you liked "Valley of Fear".. but I have to say that my favorite parts of these two novels are the "Part Twos" which contain no Holmes at all. It's just good storywriting from Doyle..

"Yes, Birdy Edwards is here... I am Birdy Edwards!"

... amazing..

Best Holmes Short Story: "The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton" Holmes is so certain of how vile and terrible the title characther is.. and he agrees to help obtain some blackmail information for a client.. and for the first time.. Holmes and Watson are actually willing to break the law in order to help!

P.S. I'll have to do alot of Poirot reading.. see if this guy really comes even close to touching Holmes  :P

Jd- wrote:Jeremy Brett is the definitive Holmes on screen--won't see any argument from me.


Ever seen Basil Rathbone? hehe.. from watching his films.. when i read Holmes or think of Holmes I just can't help but picture him..
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karitaru
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Re: Your favorite Mystery novels

Postby karitaru » March 7th, 2008, 10:34 pm

x64_02 wrote:...  I agree that Brett is the best Holmes and have watched all of that also ...


Having said that, I think that Suchet is the best Poirot. It suffices to say that whenever I read a poirot novel, I can't take his picture out of my mind.
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karitaru
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Re: Your favorite Mystery novels

Postby karitaru » March 7th, 2008, 10:38 pm

EdogawaConanTantei wrote:
2. A Study in Scarlet(more a novella)
3. Hound of the Baskervilles
4. The Valley of Fear



You mentioned all the Holmes's novel except for "the sign of four" which I didn't see anybody mention. I think it is the best Holmes novel ever. Not many people mention the valley of Fear since like a study in scarlet, Holmes makes a minimal appearance for reasons I am not going to discuss, lest I spoil the story.
Yeah by the way I hate "Baskervilles" to the bone!!!
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xpon
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Re: Your favorite Mystery novels

Postby xpon » March 7th, 2008, 10:46 pm

For me the best is An "Enid Blyton Art"

The Famous Five (series)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Famous ... Characters


I really Like Those 5
xpon is so cute...

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Even Ayumi~chan and Sera~chan love to hug him.....

Thanks to sonoci & Yuri
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Re: Your favorite Mystery novels

Postby Jd- » March 8th, 2008, 1:04 am

EdogawaConanTantei wrote:Ever seen Basil Rathbone? hehe.. from watching his films.. when i read Holmes or think of Holmes I just can't help but picture him..


Of course. He simply isn't a character actor, with Jeremy Brett being the best of them. Brett really brings the character to the screen the way no one has before and does it better than all those before him. As I said before: The Granada adaptations are the best there is, even if they do change things every few episodes perhaps just to annoy the hell out of me. While I'm sure Basil was a great actor in his day, he's unfortunately in a series of Holmes movies I can never respect. If you're going to use the original stories--and I do prefer that very strongly to any pastiche... Follow them, don't base-it-upon or mix-them-together. That really annoys me. Not to mention that, in the Rathbone "films," Nigel Bruce played Watson like a damn moron. Watson is not a buffoon; there's no reason to play him that way.

In fact, it's sad, but the most faithful adaptations of the novels are the animated versions featuring Peter O'Toole. In 40-odd minutes, they're able to wrap up everything by closely following--though at times abbreviating--the story. They even left in scenes in The Sign of Four's adaptation that I personally would have removed on that time-frame (Watson's watch, for example). Nicely done on their end. The Brett adaptations of HOUN and SIGN are both very good, with only a few slight changes here and there that can, again, be forgiven for Brett (and the overall "faithfulness" factor throughout the series).
1337_Gaara

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Re: Your favorite Mystery novels

Postby 1337_Gaara » March 8th, 2008, 2:31 pm

My top two favorites are:
1: And Then There Were None/Ten Little Indians
2: A Study in Scarlet

Personally I rather liked Hound of the Baskervilles, I don't know what it was, but something is just right about it. Study in Scarlet is one of my all time favorites because I also have a great dislike for Mormons >.)... I am not certain whether you would or would not classify Patterson as mystery or not (I tent to think of him as more of a suspense with mystery on the side). I know that his works do not classify as Mystery Novels (or maybe they do...), but I love and have read all of his Alex Cross and Womens Murder Club books (I am currently reading 7th Heaven when I find the time, currently 1/4 in). If you have never read a James Patterson book, then you might wanna pick one up :D

Nice lists btw... I love Christie and agree with almost all of your lists (personally I think the Hardy Boys beats Drew because of their use of a certain word with dual meanings ;) )
Last edited by 1337_Gaara on March 8th, 2008, 2:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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karitaru
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Re: Your favorite Mystery novels

Postby karitaru » March 9th, 2008, 1:04 am

1337_Gaara wrote:... (even though it breaks one of the 20 Rules for Detective Stories )...


Just out of curiousity, what are these rules?
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1337_Gaara

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Re: Your favorite Mystery novels

Postby 1337_Gaara » March 9th, 2008, 1:51 am

"THE DETECTIVE story is a kind of intellectual game. It is more — it is a sporting event. And for the writing of detective stories there are very definite laws — unwritten, perhaps, but none the less binding; and every respectable and self-respecting concocter of literary mysteries lives up to them. Herewith, then, is a sort Credo, based partly on the practice of all the great writers of detective stories, and partly on the promptings of the honest author's inner conscience. To wit:

  1. The reader must have equal opportunity with the detective for solving the mystery. All clues must be plainly stated and described.

  2. No willful tricks or deceptions may be placed on the reader other than those played legitimately by the criminal on the detective himself.

  3. There must be no love interest. The business in hand is to bring a criminal to the bar of justice, not to bring a lovelorn couple to the hymeneal altar.

  4. The detective himself, or one of the official investigators, should never turn out to be the culprit. This is bald trickery, on a par with offering some one a bright penny for a five-dollar gold piece. It's false pretenses.

  5. The culprit must be determined by logical deductions — not by accident or coincidence or unmotivated confession. To solve a criminal problem in this latter fashion is like sending the reader on a deliberate wild-goose chase, and then telling him, after he has failed, that you had the object of his search up your sleeve all the time. Such an author is no better than a practical joker.

  6. The detective novel must have a detective in it; and a detective is not a detective unless he detects. His function is to gather clues that will eventually lead to the person who did the dirty work in the first chapter; and if the detective does not reach his conclusions through an analysis of those clues, he has no more solved his problem than the schoolboy who gets his answer out of the back of the arithmetic.

  7. There simply must be a corpse in a detective novel, and the deader the corpse the better. No lesser crime than murder will suffice. Three hundred pages is far too much pother for a crime other than murder. After all, the reader's trouble and expenditure of energy must be rewarded.

  8. The problem of the crime must he solved by strictly naturalistic means. Such methods for learning the truth as slate-writing, ouija-boards, mind-reading, spiritualistic se'ances, crystal-gazing, and the like, are taboo. A reader has a chance when matching his wits with a rationalistic detective, but if he must compete with the world of spirits and go chasing about the fourth dimension of metaphysics, he is defeated ab initio.

  9. There must be but one detective — that is, but one protagonist of deduction — one deus ex machina. To bring the minds of three or four, or sometimes a gang of detectives to bear on a problem, is not only to disperse the interest and break the direct thread of logic, but to take an unfair advantage of the reader. If there is more than one detective the reader doesn't know who his codeductor is. It's like making the reader run a race with a relay team.

  10. The culprit must turn out to be a person who has played a more or less prominent part in the story — that is, a person with whom the reader is familiar and in whom he takes an interest.

  11. A servant must not be chosen by the author as the culprit. This is begging a noble question. It is a too easy solution. The culprit must be a decidedly worth-while person — one that wouldn't ordinarily come under suspicion.

  12. There must be but one culprit, no matter how many murders are committed. The culprit may, of course, have a minor helper or co-plotter; but the entire onus must rest on one pair of shoulders: the entire indignation of the reader must be permitted to concentrate on a single black nature.

  13. Secret societies, camorras, mafias, et al., have no place in a detective story. A fascinating and truly beautiful murder is irremediably spoiled by any such wholesale culpability. To be sure, the murderer in a detective novel should be given a sporting chance; but it is going too far to grant him a secret society to fall back on. No high-class, self-respecting murderer would want such odds.

  14. The method of murder, and the means of detecting it, must be be rational and scientific. That is to say, pseudo-science and purely imaginative and speculative devices are not to be tolerated in the roman policier. Once an author soars into the realm of fantasy, in the Jules Verne manner, he is outside the bounds of detective fiction, cavorting in the uncharted reaches of adventure.

  15. The truth of the problem must at all times be apparent — provided the reader is shrewd enough to see it. By this I mean that if the reader, after learning the explanation for the crime, should reread the book, he would see that the solution had, in a sense, been staring him in the face-that all the clues really pointed to the culprit — and that, if he had been as clever as the detective, he could have solved the mystery himself without going on to the final chapter. That the clever reader does often thus solve the problem goes without saying.

  16. A detective novel should contain no long descriptive passages, no literary dallying with side-issues, no subtly worked-out character analyses, no "atmospheric" preoccupations. such matters have no vital place in a record of crime and deduction. They hold up the action and introduce issues irrelevant to the main purpose, which is to state a problem, analyze it, and bring it to a successful conclusion. To be sure, there must be a sufficient descriptiveness and character delineation to give the novel verisimilitude.

  17. A professional criminal must never be shouldered with the guilt of a crime in a detective story. Crimes by housebreakers and bandits are the province of the police departments — not of authors and brilliant amateur detectives. A really fascinating crime is one committed by a pillar of a church, or a spinster noted for her charities.

  18. A crime in a detective story must never turn out to be an accident or a suicide. To end an odyssey of sleuthing with such an anti-climax is to hoodwink the trusting and kind-hearted reader.

  19. The motives for all crimes in detective stories should be personal. International plottings and war politics belong in a different category of fiction — in secret-service tales, for instance. But a murder story must be kept gemütlich, so to speak. It must reflect the reader's everyday experiences, and give him a certain outlet for his own repressed desires and emotions.

  20. And (to give my Credo an even score of items) I herewith list a few of the devices which no self-respecting detective story writer will now avail himself of. They have been employed too often, and are familiar to all true lovers of literary crime. To use them is a confession of the author's ineptitude and lack of originality. (a) Determining the identity of the culprit by comparing the butt of a cigarette left at the scene of the crime with the brand smoked by a suspect. (b) The bogus spiritualistic se'ance to frighten the culprit into giving himself away. (c) Forged fingerprints. (d) The dummy-figure alibi. (e) The dog that does not bark and thereby reveals the fact that the intruder is familiar. (f)The final pinning of the crime on a twin, or a relative who looks exactly like the suspected, but innocent, person. (g) The hypodermic syringe and the knockout drops. (h) The commission of the murder in a locked room after the police have actually broken in. (i) The word association test for guilt. (j) The cipher, or code letter, which is eventually unraveled by the sleuth." Sorry this is so long  :-[, my source is:http://gaslight.mtroyal.ab.ca/vandine.htm. I decreased font size...
If you need it bigger to read copy this into a text editor and increase size...
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Paperclip
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Re: Your favorite Mystery novels

Postby Paperclip » March 9th, 2008, 10:37 pm

I love a lot of what you people are putting down, my favorites being "Oriental Express," and "Death on the Nile" (and I've read through my complete Holmes collection I don't know how many times).

Has anyone here ever read/heard of "The Japanese Golden Dozen?" It's a bunch of short japanese mysteries from the Japans' golden era of mystery and it's compiled by Ellery Queen. It had some pretty mysteries in it.
karitaru
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Re: Your favorite Mystery novels

Postby karitaru » March 10th, 2008, 3:52 am

Paperclip wrote:Has anyone here ever read/heard of "The Japanese Golden Dozen?" It's a bunch of short japanese mysteries from the Japans' golden era of mystery and it's compiled by Ellery Queen. It had some pretty mysteries in it.


I'll definitely make sure to put it in top of my list. I am crazy with anything "japanese"!
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Re: Your favorite Mystery novels

Postby krystal.glass » March 10th, 2008, 11:18 am

Paperclip wrote:I love a lot of what you people are putting down, my favorites being "Oriental Express," and "Death on the Nile"


:D I really liked Death on the Nile when I first watched it on tv... I only read it after that. And when i actually read it, it was really long and kinda boring so the show kinda ruined my reading experience for me. The mystery itself, that was nice.

I was 10 or something when I actually read Murder on the Orient Express and I was really impressed then. When I reread it recently it put me off a little... hehe even though I stated earlier that it was 'Chirstie at her best'. What a hypocrite I am, ne? I shouldn't have read it again... *sigh*

I've always wanted to read Ellery Queen... *adds book in 'to read' list*  thx for the recommendation!
"But perhaps my first mistake lies in trying to find motive, in thinking of humans as rational beings whose actions spring from logical reasons."

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Paperclip
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Re: Your favorite Mystery novels

Postby Paperclip » March 10th, 2008, 1:16 pm

krystal.glass wrote:
Paperclip wrote:I love a lot of what you people are putting down, my favorites being "Oriental Express," and "Death on the Nile"


:D I really liked Death on the Nile when I first watched it on tv... I only read it after that. And when i actually read it, it was really long and kinda boring so the show kinda ruined my reading experience for me. The mystery itself, that was nice.

I was 10 or something when I actually read Murder on the Orient Express and I was really impressed then. When I reread it recently it put me off a little... hehe even though I stated earlier that it was 'Chirstie at her best'. What a hypocrite I am, ne? I shouldn't have read it again... *sigh*

I've always wanted to read Ellery Queen... *adds book in 'to read' list*  thx for the recommendation!


DotN was a little slow, but to me the ending made it worth it. My only problem with it was that the other mystery in it was pretty much just given away (the killer the inspector was after)

I can't for the life of me find any Ellery Queen books. The compilation of Japanese mysteries by him (them, technically) is the only thing I've been able to find, and I found that at my school's library

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